Inland Equity Community Land Trust Strategic Plan


Executive Summary

This Inland equity Community Land Trust Five Year Plan comes from a beautiful blend of advocates for affordable housing in the I.E. who represent a broad range of non-profit service providers, community organisations and individuals from our community who are eager to find a solution to the chronic housing crisis. We have non-profit experience, advocated for the houseless, fought for policies to end poverty, championed immigrants rights, helped in food pantries, worked in colleges mentoring students, civic clubs and are involved in grassroots organising. Many of us also struggled with housing insecurity (at least half of the board are renters themselves), we thought it would be of strategic personal and public importance to start a community land trust. Through the years of 2018 and 2019, we organized several readings and meetings, engaged coffee and conversation and took input from people not initially involved but experienced houselessness or were housing insecure. And on January 14th, 2020, we passed Inland Equity Community Land Trust’s By-laws to become a non-profit and paperwork for our state and federal status happened in May with our first operating bank account opening in May of 2020. Although a great deal of planning was devoted to hosting a Michelada Festival in Coachella City as our breakout community and media event, the global pandemic of COVID, obliterated that option, and we later organized a streamed “Housing for All Telethon” (on Facebook and Zoom) to raise funds to house Jesus and Anabell--a homeless immigrant couple in Coachella. Through our fundraising efforts from the telethon and winning operation grant-money, we were able to buy them an RV to house them in December of 2020. The initial plans of doing small projects to establish ourselves as a nonprofit housing developer continue. Over the next year we will renovate a duplex in Coachella that can be restored to habitable condition and place two Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) on the property of Iglesia Palabra Vive. These spaces will be made available at below market rate, by agreement with the land owners. As we move forward over the next five years we will develop Inland Equity Community Land Trust into a housing development nonprofit. This document maps that progress. With the work of the community members, civic organizations and grassroots activists that make up our Executive and Advisory Board members, we have mapped out our objectives and indicators for the following five-years.

Vision and Mission Statement

The Inland Equity Community Land Trust is a community land trust that develops and stewards affordable housing and other community assets in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Inland Equity Community Land Trust's mission is to provide a permanent housing solution to inland residents who fall under HUD’s definition of  “housing cost burdened.” 

HUD defines cost-burdened families as those “who pay more than 30% of their income for housing” and “may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing, transportation, and medical care.” Severe rent burden is defined as paying more than 50 percent of one's income on rent. While our immediate aims are to house the precarious, the Inland Equity Community Land Trust’s ultimate goal is to include residents who are not housing burdened in a mixed-income development model that maintains a commitment to affordability, diversity, high-quality architecture, energy conservation, and resident participation in managing the trust.

“Behind every decaying neighborhood is a development plan that doesn’t include the people who live there. We’re not going anywhere unless you price us out.”

~ Glenn Ross, McElderry Park, Baltimore

Values

Inland Equity Community Land Trust will develop high-quality, affordable and environmentally sustainable housing so people can thrive in the community where they work. We will produce beautiful and environmentally sustainable housing. Community land trusts have the potential to challenge the conventional housing market through emphasis on long-term affordable housing for lower-income families through equity sharing. All over the world, poor people live in houses. There is no reason poor people in the Inland Empire can't. The Inland Equity Community Land Trust is working to develop affordable housing for people paying more than 30% of their income on housing. Our charitable goal is to serve renters who will be able to lower their housing costs and become homeowners invested in their community. In partnership with CBO's, government agencies and service providers currently working with Inland Equity Community Land Trust, our primary goal is to establish the Inland Equity Community Land Trust as an endpoint for the path out of homelessness. A functioning emergency shelter system would serve as a pipeline into supportive housing with social services and into affordable housing within the land trust. Though this is our charitable goal, the need for affordable housing in Riverside and San Bernardino counties remains an ongoing crisis. We also want to make affordable housing available to any community member who would like to own a home in the trust. This will facilitate a mixed income community of homeowners invested in their own community. The housing, held in trust, guarantees it will remain affordable and future generations will be able to grow and thrive in the community where they grew up.

 

Campaign Outline

 

Creating permanent affordability in housing has been challenging for the entire history of the United States. When it was available it came at great humanitarian costs to the people who already lived in the places where poor people were encouraged to migrate. The manipulation of land prices and theft of land by railroads, banks and robber barons has a long and sorted history. The post World War Two housing boom fueled by HUD developments and subsidised home loans alleviated the problem for many white people and contributed to the creation of the post WW2 middle class. People of color on the other hand were directed into rental units. An Example is in the comparison of the Levittown and Cabrini-Green developments. 

 

Levittown:

 

  • Subsidised Homeownership
  • Taxpayer financed construction of roads, water, sewer and electrical infrastructure
  • Mixed income families (The suburb was only partially HUD housing)
  • Residence became homeowners who could pass the home on to their children
  • Segregated by law until the mid sixties

 

Cabrini-Green:

 

  • Subsidised Rentals
  • Built by existing roads, water, sewer and electricity infrastructure
  • Neglected maintenance do to corrupt Chicago public policy
  • Concentrating of poverty
  • Residence were regularly means tested
  • Residence could not pass the home on to their children

 

A community land trust can preserve affordability and create homeownership. The subsidies that go into providing the housing are preserved by the equity sharing agreement between the homeowner and the land trust. When the homeowner sells their home, the subsidy is passed on to the new buyer. Community land trusts work through public-private partnerships with nonprofit developers to build and finance affordable housing projects, including by leveraging Low Income Housing Tax Credits and other local funding sources. The Community land trusts also use foundation funding and loans to support development projects. Projects also often leverage Community Development Block Grant and HOME funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Inland Equity Community Land Trust grows out of the Inland Equity Partnerships long history of advocacy on issues of poverty in California. We have built the Board of the land trust from the organisations that are part of Inland equity Partnership. We have cultivated relationships over many years with foundations who support our work and will be able to leverage that support for the development of equatable and permanently affordable housing in Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

Goals, Tasks and Key Performance Indicators

After consulting community members, civic organizations and grassroots activists, as well as our own thoughts and feelings about the housing needs of the Inland Empire to erase the inequity found in housing, we decided to generate an individual wish-list from each participant. What follows below came to fruition from a survey we conducted of our Executive and Advisory Board members to map out our goals and objectives for the following five-years:

 

  1. Establish Inland Equity Community Land Trust as a 501c3 with a fully functioning board and staff.
    1. Our 1st board elected by members of the land trust is serving
    2. We have a board member in Banning Pass, High Desert and West End of San Bernardino county.
    3. We have fully completed our slots for an Advisory Board that widens our regional diversity
    4. We selected candidates for executive or advisory board from Native American communities
  2. Inland Equity Partnership is moved from Community Partners to the Inland Equity Community Land Trust as the advocacy coalition. 
    1. Inland Equity Partnership staff are moved from Community Partners to Inland Equity Community Land Trust’s 501c3
    2. All fundraising and grant applications are done for Inland Equity Community Land Trust
    3. All Inland Equity Partnership grant commitments are completed by June 2021
  3. The Community Land Trust model is seen by local jurisdictions as a solution to housing low income people 
    1. Promote the CLT model in 4 out the 11 cities in the Coachella Valley about Inland Equity Community Land Trust
    2. Build support for permanently affordable housing in 4 of the 11 cities as they update their housing element compliance
    3. Organize meetings with city electeds and officials in Riverside County to promote our vision.
    4. Organize meetings with city electeds and officials in San Bernardino County to promote our vision.
    5. Host an online presentation addressing drivers of poverty including Housing and Healthcare costs to officials from across the Inland Empire 
  4. Inland Equity Partnership is a key part of the developing single payer health care movement in California in the Inland Empire.
    1. The coalition advocates for Riverside and San Bernardino counties to fund health care with county dollars for people who can't get MediCal
    2. The coalition advocates for San Bernardino and Riverside counties and cities to used their funds for affordable housing and health care services
  5. The Inland Equity Partnership coalition increase the coalition to include 20 more non-profits and service provider members
    1. The coalition is a people of color/low income led movement working to decommodify housing & healthcare in the IE.
    2. The coalition supports state policies for community land trust and single payer health care. 
    3. The coalition develops and shares advocacy tools for how to create affordable housing and affordable housing policies in the IE.
    4. The coalition develops a newsletter and website content focused on affordable housing and health care policies and campaign events.
    5. Organise and educate to reduce resistance to low-income housing 
      1. the affordable homes are beautiful 
      2. homelessness will declined
      3. the quality of life in the community will improve
  6. Collaborations with non-profits, local government, foundations, and businesses have the Establish Inland Equity Community Land Trust firmly established as a respected member of the development ecosystem.
    1. Complete small housing projects to build a reputation as housing developers. 
      1. Annabel and Jesus
      2. Comadre Renovation
      3. Iglesia Palabra Vive  
    2. Develop a standard home loan agreement that homeowners and banks find easy to understand
    3. Promote the land trust model and inspired other nonprofits to start their own CLT
    4. Inland Equity Community Land Trust is listed on nonprofits, governmental and business partners as a solution to the housing crisis.
  7. Individual Donor Development
    1. Identify 10 seed investors who will contribute $2,500
    2. Grow our membership to 100 dues paying members
    3. Identify 10 private foundation grant opportunities that fund affordable housing initiatives.
    4. Complete all grant commitments under Community Partners and consolidate Inland Equity Partnership as a fiscally sponsored initiative of the Inland Equity Community Land Trust 
    5. Apply for city, county, special district, state and federal government grants that support housing development.
    6. Host fundraising 4 events a year with a consortium of organizations to fund permanently affordable housing.
  8. Complete housing plans for community land trust homes that are approved in Riverside, Coachella, Palm Springs, Rialto and San Bernardino
    1. Identify or develop 8 city council members to champion the CLT model
    2. Identify or develop 15 organizations to endorse Inland Equity Community Land Trust as a leader in the affordable housing movement
    3. Our membership organisations, allied organizations and developers model a sample strategic plan that develops permanent affordability.
  9. Expand the project to other cities and unincorporated areas: 
    1. Indio
    2. Perris
    3. Colton 
    4. Mecca
    5. Thermal
    1. Continue to build a base of public support for permanently affordable mixed income housing development
    2. Have a set of site plans for homes approved in 5 jurisdictions
    3. Work with CCAEJ to build a multi-unit housing using sustainable methods from the Open Building Institute.
  10. Fully Developed, our organizational capacity will have successful funding through grants, and donor development to fund a $300,000 to $350,000 Annual Operating Budget by 2022 
    1. Use the Inland Equity Community Land Trust budget to leverage financing with subsidized loans, private and government grants and individual donors.
    2. Established a revenue stream from the homes held in the trust large enough to build another home.
    3. Form the Inland Equity Community Land Trust trust fund
    4. Our staff is full time and receiving a living wage
    5. Hired staff: 
      1. managing director 
      2. development officer 
      3. communications director
      4. community organizer staff for Riverside and san Bernardino county
    6. 10 homes purchased and/or built with plans for 10 more in the next year.
    7. We have approved plans and resources to build 10 more in the next year C. A multi-housing unit that can house multiple individuals and families.
    8.  Open Building Institute to trained Southwest Carpenters’ Union members as the  Inland Equity Community Land Trust Construction co-op
  11. Families have financial equity in the homes, and we have a waiting list of future homeowners. 
    1. Our 3 bedroom homes cost $800 a month or less in mortgage payments, insurance and tax escrow
    2. We have 1500 dues paying and voting members of the Inland Equity Community Land Trust
    3. 40% to 50% of the housing we build or buy into the trust is owned by historically marginalized and formerly incarcerated people
    4. Successful communication of the benefits of community land trusts
    5. Have in place blueprints for future housing developments.
    6. Have pre approved blueprints for rammed earth and adobe homes.
    7. WHave a modular ADU supplier that has affordable ADUs that can be quickly developed.
    8. Have approved site plans to build a housing in 
      1. City of  Riverside
      2. City of  San Bernardino 
      3. City of  Coachella 
      4. City of  Colton

Management And Staffing

While both the Executive and Advisory Boards of the Inland Equity Community Land Trust are unpaid volunteers, we have two part-time staff who provide support to the many needs that accompany outreach, advocacy and grant-funding. Maribel Nunez, the Executive Director of Inland Equity Community Land trust, has a phone full of thousands of contacts from activists, to community leaders and public officials, and has a sagacious clairvoyance on how to read a room and best strategize using best practices to achieve our goals. The other member of the Inland Equity Partnership, Jeff Green, is a deep-dive researcher on the California budget, and knows the ins and outs of where funding can be found to gain and grow as an organization. As our chief grant writer, he also communicates with funders and sends out our applications as well as keeps records of our financial and legal documents. 

 

Developing Our Program Plans

While we have only been a non-profit organization with a Board of Directors since May of 2020, in a time where nonprofits face daunting funding challenges with a global pandemic, the Inland Equity Community Land Trust has made great strides in less than a year of its infancy. The first and most important success was the creation of our Executive and Advisory Boards, which was done in the matter of just three months, an impressive feat with a small number of staff. Additionally, we were able to successfully fundraise online and win a Riverside City CARES Act to provide rent relief to many in Riverside City and the I.E.. Our sterling achievement, though, was our successful, inaugural event, which involved putting on a “Housing for All Telethon” that led to the successful housing of a formerly homeless Latino couple, who were trapped in a dying van, scorched by the heat of Coachella Valley and facing bleak prospects. Given our collective efforts with the community and funders, Jesus and Anabell, now both have a fully functional RV to call their home. Not only have they’ve been housed, but they are now donating their time to help other houseless folks at the Catholic Mission in Coachella City. Human solidarity and love and compassion are contagious, and we were greatly moved that they have turned their own hurt into a fuel to help others, promising to help our organization in any way they can by sharing their story. While our attempt at putting on a Michelada Festival to build community awareness and raise funds to house the houseless and rent-burdened was crashed with COVID could have crushed us, we gathered closer and brain-stormed new goals and objectives for the remainder of 2020. After consulting community members, civic organizations and grassroots activists, as well as our own thoughts and feelings about the housing needs of the Inland Empire to erase the inequity found in housing, we decided to generate an individual wish-list from each participant. What follows below came to fruition from a survey we conducted of our Executive and Advisory Board members to map out our goals and objectives for the following five-years: 

 

 

Five-Year Program Plans

1) Advocacy efforts are addressing drivers of poverty including Housing and Healthcare costs: 

 

A. Inland Equity Community Land Trust is a key part of the developing single payer health care movement in California in the Inland Empire 

  • Riverside and San Bernardino counties are now funding health care with county dollars for people who can't get MediCal 
  • San Bernardino and Riverside counties and cities used their funds affordable housing and health care services 

B. The Inland Equity Community Land Trust is seen by local jurisdictions as a solution to housing low income people

  • Talk to 4 out the 11 cities in the Coachella Valley about Inland Equity Community Land Trust 
  • Help 4 of the 11 cities update their housing element 
  • We organized a meeting with all of the mayors in Riverside County to discuss our vision. 
  • We organized a meeting with all of the mayors of San Bernardino County to discuss our vision 
  • We hosted a Zoom presentation to interested City Council members from across the Inland Empire 

C. The Inland Equity Community Partnership coalition has grown to include 20 more non-profits and service provider members 

  • Respected coalition membership people of color/low income led movement, decommodifying housing & health care in the Inland Empire. 

D. The state passed the Homeless Place to Be bill sponsored by Time For Change and Inland Equity Partnership

  • state sponsored legislation prioritizing funding and supportive policies for community land trust and single payer 

E. Advocacy tools for how to create affordable housing policies in your city and county within our membership coalition 

  • Monthly newsletters and weekly website updates regarding affordable housing and health care policies and campaign updates 

2) Collaborations with non-profits, Government, foundations, and businesses have us firmly established as a respected member of the development ecosystem. 

A. We have a standard home loan agreement that homeowners and banks find easy to understand 

B. The success of the land trust model has inspired other nonprofits to start their own 

  • We are listed on several websites of nonprofits, governmental and business partners as a solution to the housing crisis. 

C. Set plans for community land trust that are approved in Riverside, Coachella, Palm Springs, Rialto and San Bernardino 

  • The resistance to low-income housing has vanished because the affordable homes are beautiful and homelessness has declined 
  • Get 8 city council members to endorse the Inland Equity Community Land Trust 
  • Get 15 organizations to endorse Inland Equity Community Land Trust 
  • Our membership groups along with allied organizations, developers have set strategic plan to show to decision makers and funders 
  • Expand planning to addlt cities like Indio, Perris, Colton and unincorporated areas like Mecca & Thermal working w/ new members 
  • Gained public support for low-income housing due to mixed income housing projects 
  • We have a set of plans for homes on file that are approved in 5 jurisdictions 

D. We joined forces with CCAEJ to build a multi-unit housing complex using sustainable methods from the Open Building Institute 

E. Inland Equity Community Land Trust is part of public bank coalitions 

3) Our organizational capacity has provided for successful funding through grants, and donor development which cover a $300,000/350,000 Annual Budget, a $3,000,000 capital budget financed by subsidized loans, private and government grants, and $20,000 in reserves. 

A. We have an established revenue stream from the homes in the trust that is large enough to build another home 

B. Form a trust fund for Inland Equity Community Land Trust 

C. Needs List 

  • We have secured 500K-1million in grants and donor gifts to buy a large parcel of land to build a multi-housing community 
  • We raised 80K to organize a training session to have OBI to train future enlistees in our Working Construction co-op 
  • We have raised 60K to create the Inland Equity Institute which will create data and outreach on housing needs. 
  • Our fully functioning staff can provide a stipend to what is currently volunteer work. 
  • Our staff is full time and receiving a living wage 
  • Hired both a managing director and development officer and started fundraising for marketing director 
  • Get a commendations staff member 
  • Find more community organizer staff for Riverside and san Bernardino county 

D. Individual Donor Development 

  • Find 10 seed investors with $ 2,500 
  • 35% of general operations is membership dues and 20% of general operations & housing projects comes from individual donors 

E. Private Foundation grants. 

  • Out of the private foundation grants received, 80% of those grants are unrestricted and fund our affordable housing projects. 
  • All grant commitments under Community Partners are completed and Inland Equity Partnership and Inland Equity Community Land Trust are operating 100% under the Inland Equity Community Land Trust c3 

F. Government Grants 

  • 50% of our grants are government grants (city, county, special districts, state and federal) 

G. We host a Gala/fundraiser with a consortium of organizations to fund a future housing project. 

4) 10 of sustainable, healthy, comfortable land/homes purchased and/or built with community input with plans for 10 more in the next year. (At least one built by the trust.) 

A. Get 100 people to endorse Inland Equity Community Land Trust 

  • Hold meetings in the city where the Inland Equity Community Land Trust would be built 
  • Get 25 testimonies on why a land trust would be needed 
  • Find 25 testimonies from people in the housing waiting list 

B. We have approved plans and resources to build 10 more in the next year C. A multi-housing unit that can house multiple individuals and families. 

5) Established as a 501c3 with a fully functioning board and staff. 

A. Our 1st board elected by members of the land trust is serving 

  • We have a board member in Banning Pass, High Desert and West End of San Bernardino county. 
  • We have fully completed our slots for an Advisory Board that widens our regional diversity 
  • We selected candidates for executive or advisory board from Native American communities (Reservation) 

6) Families have financial equity in the homes, and we have a waiting list. 

A. Our 3 bedroom homes cost $500 a month or less in mortgage payments and insurance and tax escrow 

B. We have a waiting list of 25/50/150 individuals. 

  • Our waiting list are people who are dues paying and voting members of the CLT 

C. 20% to 50% of the housing we build or buy into the trust is owned by formerly incarcerated and historically marginalized people 

D. Communicate the criteria to live in land trust 

7) Blueprints are in place for future housing developments. 

A. We have approved blueprints for 2, 3 and 4 bedroom rammed earth homes 

  • We have approved blueprints for 2, 3 and 4 bedroom adobe homes 

B. We have a modular ADU supplier that has affordable ADUs that meet the state's standards 

C. Get community input on what the design of land trust should look like 

D. Blueprints in Place 

  • We have a blueprint to build a housing development in Riverside City. 
  • We have a blueprint to build a housing development in San Bernardino City. 
  • We have a blueprint to build a housing development in Coachella City. 
  • Blueprint for CDU construction at Pablo Iglesias Church. 
  • Blueprint for CDU multi-units in Colton, California. 
  • Approved blueprints for a 5 to 10 unit apartment buildings 

 

Financing

As a 510(c)(3) charitable organization, Inland Equity Community Land Trust can generally leverage public sector investment with private tax-deductible contributions. In a national survey of Community Land Trusts conducted by the Lincoln Institute in 2006, half of the 119 respondents reported receiving private donations Sungu-Eryilmaz and Greenstein 2007). A smaller survey conducted the same year by Jeff Corey of the Northern Communities CLT in Duluth and Jeff Washburne of the City of Lakes CLT in Minneapolis found that Community Land Trusts received between 10 percent and 70 percent of their operating revenue from private sources. 

Foundation grants. 

Community foundations, family foundations, and larger grantmaking foundations with an interest in affordable housing are frequent Community Land Trust contributors. While a few provide ongoing, unrestricted operating funds, foundations usually tie their grants to specific outcomes or programs. The California Community Foundation, for example, recognized how rapidly rising land costs were eroding its ability to support affordable housing in the Los Angeles region and founded the Community Foundation Land Trust. Its contribution of $3.8 million can be used for operations and initial projects. 

Individual donations. 

Some Community Land Trusts direct ongoing fundraising efforts at the local community. Although time-consuming, these programs can generate significant revenue and build important community goodwill. In fact, some small Community Land Trusts, such as the Community Land Trust Association of West Marin (CLAM) in Point Reyes Station, raise the majority of their annual operating budgets from individual donations. 

Revenues from Project Development 

The majority of Community Land Trusts collect fees for each unit of affordable housing they help to develop. Development fees may be structured as a flat amount per unit or as a percentage of total development costs. The City of Madison, for example, allows the Madison Area CLT to take a developer fee of up to 15 percent of a project’s total costs. Community Land Trusts also generate operating income from a number of internal sources, which steadily increase as their portfolios of land and housing grow larger. 

Ground lease fees. 

A Community Land Trust’s ground lease fees are its most reliable revenue source. While a few CLTs now charge as much as $100 per month, these fees tend to be in the $25–50 range, set well below the market value of the leasehold to keep the homes affordable. Even at this low price, however, with multiple properties in the portfolios can realize significant operating revenues from this source. Thistle Community Housing in Boulder, for example, reports that ground lease fees averaging $30 a month on its 211 resale-restricted, owner-occupied units cover almost a third of the cost of running the program. 

Lease reissuance/resale fees. 

Many Community Land Trusts collect fees when units change hands, using these revenues to defray the costs of managing the transfer. In some cases, the fee is charged to the sellers, reducing their proceeds in the same way a broker’s commission would. In other cases, fees are added to the resale price, increasing the cost of the home to the next buyer. 

Membership dues. 

Area residents who support the Community Land Trust generally pay annual membership dues ranging from $1 to $50. With more than 4,000 members, the Champlain Housing Trust in Burlington collects over $70,000 in membership fees annually, covering about 5 percent of its operating budget. 

Fee-for-service income. 

Some Community Land Trusts earn fees for performing specific services such as educating prospective homebuyers, packaging loans for local mortgage lenders, and monitoring local inclusionary housing units on behalf of a city or county. 

Private Foundation Funding Housing in Southern California: 

  • The H.N. and Frances C. Berger Foundation 
  • Bank of America Foundation 
  • Annenberg Foundation 
  • Coeta and Donald Barker Foundation 
  • Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation 
  • John Jewett & H. Chandler Garland Foundation 
  • Gannett Foundation 
  • J.B. and Emily Van Nuys Foundation 
  • Wells Fargo 
  • Kresge Foundation 
  • Butler Family Fund 
  • California Community Foundation 
  • Conrad N. Hilton Foundation 

County, State and Federal Financing for Housing: 

California’s Proposition 1 authorized $4 billion in general obligation bonds for housing-related programs, loans, grants, and projects and housing loans for veterans. The measure was designed to distribute the bond revenue as follows: 

  • $300 million for the Local Housing Trust Matching Grant Program, which offers matching grants to local housing trust funds for "pilot programs to demonstrate innovative, cost-saving approaches to creating or preserving affordable housing;" and 
  • $300 million for the Self-Help Housing Fund, which provides forgivable loans for mortgage assistance, the development of multiple home ownership units, and manufactured homes. 

Hud section 108 Loans 

California Enterprise Development Authority CEDA 501(c)(3) Loan 

California enterprise development /authority revenue bond financing 

  • County issued Single Family Mortgage Revenue Bonds 
  • County issued Multi-Family Mortgage Revenue Bonds

 

The Inland Equity Community Land Trust Financial Projections:

https://inlandequityclt.org/content/ie-clt-financial-projections

 

Inland Equity Community Land Trust 2021 Operating Budget:

https://inlandequityclt.org/content/inland-equity-community-land-trust-2...